If I have a blog that is getting 100,000 page views a month that means that I’m probably getting at least 50,000 people to the site (most blogs will do between 1.2 to 1.4 pages per session). That means I have to try and get some small percentage of those people to buy something from me if I really want to do well. If I can’t get them to buy something then (in some cases) I have ads running on the site that will make me money anyways.
This is a great post Yaro. I like the progression you take us through on which things you tried first and eventually evolved into doing now. I know for me #8 and #9 work best for me to achieve passive income online. I started with eBay also and like you said I think it is a great way for beginners to learn SEO, sales copy, customer service, handling transactions etc. This will prep you for selling your own physical or digital products on your own site. Do you think you will hit the mobile space?
With drop shipping, you’re effectively partnering with a manufacturer or wholesaler to sell their products. This way, you don’t pay upfront costs to buy inventory, aren’t sitting on unsold items taking up expensive warehouse space, and don’t have to deal with shipping the products yourself. You simply create your site, fill it with drop shippable products, and drive in customers, with almost everything else done for you.
I don’t know whether it’s just me or if perhaps everyone else encountering issues with your site. It appears as if some of the written text on your posts are running off the screen. Can somebody else please comment and let me know if this is happening to them as well? This might be a issue with my browser because I’ve had this happen previously. I appreciate it.

Coding – whether for developing apps or designing websites – is another big business online! It’s a pretty egalitarian business as well, since you can teach yourself to code in many languages and you can code from wherever you are. At its most basic, all you need is a computer (or laptop or tablet), an Internet connection for connecting with project files or far-flung colleagues, and a text editor. (The software involved can get more complicated than that, as you go along.) There are more small businesses wanting customized websites and startups trying to create that next great app every day, and coders can make a living along the way.
Robert said he did an average of 4-6 of these gigs per year for a while depending on his schedule and the work involved. The best part is, he charged a flat rate that usually worked out to around $100 per hour. And remember, this was pay he was earning to advise people on the best ways to use social media tools like Facebook and Pinterest to grow their brands.
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